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Sponsored by an educational grant from Pure Storage
As electronic health records (EHRs), interoperability and value-based care have grown more important in healthcare, an increasing number of providers are tasking IT departments with developing, implementing and managing complex enterprise imaging (EI) strategies. And one of the biggest components of any EI strategy is its ability to properly store the massive amounts of data the provider produces on a daily basis.
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Sponsored by an educational grant from Sectra
Hartford HealthCare is Connecticut’s most comprehensive healthcare network. Over the last several years, this community and academic health system has grown significantly through its strategic affiliations with hospitals and a variety of providers. To support that growth, the health system brought on a Sectra Vendor Neutral Archive (VNA) to manage inpatient and ambulatory medical images across the enterprise. Image access and archiving became a strategic priority—initiated and dubbed the ImageConnect Project by Interventional Radiologist Barry Stein, MD, to guarantee physician access anywhere and anytime via their Epic EMR, says Richard Shirey, senior vice president and CIO and 40-year healthcare veteran whose task it was to execute on the project. Today IT is driving full enterprise access to patient images and information.
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Sponsored by an educational grant from FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc.
At RSNA 2017 in Chicago, FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc., is unveiling its brand new suite of solutions for pediatric patients. Each solution was designed specifically to combat the challenges associated with treating children while focusing on efficiency, low radiation dose and convenience.
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Sponsored by an educational grant from FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc.
The Radiology Department at Driscoll Children’s Hospital in Corpus Christi, Texas, didn’t need a nudge from Washington, D.C., to upgrade to digital radiography (DR). With one exception, the department’s x-ray rooms were fully DR-capable as of last year; Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) said it would start reducing payments for analog X-ray in 2017 and for computed radiography (CR) in 2018.
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Sponsored by an educational grant from FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc.
She did it once then and she’s done it again. In 1989, Mary Lou Catania, RN, brought modern mammography to the women of California’s Monterey Peninsula when she founded the Mammography Center of Monterey. It was a bold move: She had limited resources and no direct experience working in radiology, much less running a business. What she did have was her own need to be screened for breast cancer—and her realization that the only technology offered locally was old-and-fading, xeromammography.
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Sponsored by an educational grant from Sectra
What tools and tactics are making breast imaging specialists and clinicians more efficient across the healthcare enterprise?
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Sponsored by an educational grant from Philips
Being a radiologist today can feel a bit like being on the Starship Enterprise: you have all these Star-Trek-like tools at your disposal – devices and applications with the ability to produce incredibly sophisticated digital images and insights that we couldn’t have imagined even twenty years ago. This technology and advanced visualization capabilities have fundamentally changed the way we obtain important diagnostic information and provide value for patients. But the reality is, it gets lonely in space. Behind this technology are people – and people still seek a meaningful human exchange, especially patients undergoing potentially stressful imaging exams. The irony of our situation is that, for all of us humans in the imaging spaceship, technology has become a barrier to meaningful care, even as the images that technology helps us acquire wield unprecedented clinical value.
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Sponsored by an educational grant from Pure Storage
Pure Storage is a data storage company based out of Mountain View, Calif., that specializes in cloud-based, analytics-focused solutions such as FlashBlade, which offers companies petabytes of capacity with no caching or tiering.
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Sponsored by an educational grant from FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc.
The imaging staff at Androscoggin Valley Hospital (AVH) in Berlin, N.H., knew the time had come to up their x-ray game when their 11-year-old computed radiography (CR) system began needing new imaging plates and maintenance. What they didn’t know was how fast, easy and cost-effective it could be to upgrade to superior digital radiography (DR) just by investing in the right DR detectors. In 2015, following comprehensive research, that’s exactly what they did.
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Sponsored by an educational grant from FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc.
Holland, 1931. Bernard George Ziedses des Plantes worked hard on the world’s first tomosynthesis machine, publishing a paper on the device he called a Planigraph. His clinical results were presented at the 1931 meeting of the Netherlands Society of Electrology and Radiology in Amsterdam, and the first commercial device was produced just a few years later.