You are here

Cardiovascular

 

A team of researchers has introduced a whole-body, post-mortem CT angiography (PMCTA) approach that could save time and money without requiring specialized equipment. By puncturing the left ventricle percutaneously and adding a contrast agent, researchers were able to identify threats for thromboembolism and aneurysm in a small sampling of cadavers.

Researchers have directly compared the performance of three noninvasive imaging methods for diagnosing myocardial ischemia—and they identified positron emission tomography (PET) as the most accurate.

European researchers have used 3D ultrasound to measure cortical folding, which increases the surface area of the brain and therefore its processing power, in fetuses with congenital heart defects. Their primary interest was in finding out whether prenatal cardiovascular anomalies affect neurodevelopment, although they also wanted to see if measuring the depths of the crevices reliably indicates the extent of folding.

European researchers have shown that heart imagers can have their MRI and their patients on exercise bikes—pedaling harder and harder—too.

Automated 3D echocardiography (3DE) analysis using a new, commercially available algorithm has allowed University of Chicago researchers to accurately quantify left-heart size and function in two-thirds of 300 consecutive patients. They conclude the technology can be useful in clinical practice despite its known workflow-interruptive drawbacks—especially when the echocardiographer has the know-how to correct for its shortcomings.

 

Recent Headlines

Left ventricular puncture proposed for whole-body PMCTA

A team of researchers has introduced a whole-body, post-mortem CT angiography (PMCTA) approach that could save time and money without requiring specialized equipment. By puncturing the left ventricle percutaneously and adding a contrast agent, researchers were able to identify threats for thromboembolism and aneurysm in a small sampling of cadavers.

PET outperforms SPECT, CCTA in diagnosing coronary artery disease

Researchers have directly compared the performance of three noninvasive imaging methods for diagnosing myocardial ischemia—and they identified positron emission tomography (PET) as the most accurate.

Trabeculation, myocardial function linked via cardiac MRI

Excess greater left ventricle (LV) trabeculation is associated with decreased average regional myocardial function, measured by myocardial strain. A team of researchers, examining MRIs of 1,123 individuals, found that average regional LV function was worse in those with greater LV trabeculation.

Prenatal 3D ultrasound shows heart defects affect brain development

European researchers have used 3D ultrasound to measure cortical folding, which increases the surface area of the brain and therefore its processing power, in fetuses with congenital heart defects. Their primary interest was in finding out whether prenatal cardiovascular anomalies affect neurodevelopment, although they also wanted to see if measuring the depths of the crevices reliably indicates the extent of folding.

Cardiac MRI feasible throughout slow-to-fast ‘bike rides’

European researchers have shown that heart imagers can have their MRI and their patients on exercise bikes—pedaling harder and harder—too.

Automated analysis of 3D echocardiography shows potential in clinical practice

Automated 3D echocardiography (3DE) analysis using a new, commercially available algorithm has allowed University of Chicago researchers to accurately quantify left-heart size and function in two-thirds of 300 consecutive patients. They conclude the technology can be useful in clinical practice despite its known workflow-interruptive drawbacks—especially when the echocardiographer has the know-how to correct for its shortcomings.

MRI helps avoid unneeded right-heart catheterization

European researchers have confirmed that MRI isn’t precise enough at assessing pulmonary hypertension to outright preclude right-heart catheterization. However, they’ve also shown that the advanced imaging pathway can appropriately supplement echocardiography to avoid such catheterization for patients who may not need the intervention.

Cardio experts urge peers to choose ICE imaging, take AFib ablation ‘fluoroless’

Forgoing fluoroscopy in favor of intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) to guide catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AFib) is not only feasible but highly desirable, as the ultrasound-based choice can squash radiation exposure for patients and care workers alike. Yet ICE has failed to catch on with electrophysiologists even after several years of ready availability. Why is that?

Pediatric heart care gets help imaging children gently, informing parents fully

Parents and doctors of children with heart disease have a new resource as they seek the best diagnostics with the least radiation. Called the “Have-a-Heart” campaign, it’s a collaborative effort led by the Image Gently Alliance together with the American Academy of Pediatrics and a coalition of pediatric medicine and cardiology organizations.

Ultralow-dose CT shows potential to substitute for standard coronary calcium imaging

Compared side-by-side with standard cardiac CT for calcium scoring, ultralow-dose CT shows good sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy despite its markedly lower radiation dose. In fact, it’s unlikely to miss coronary calcification in patients with at least moderate calcium load and could offer a sensible alternative for some patients sent for coronary CT angiography.

Pages