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Diagnostic Imaging

 

Emergency physicians armed with point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) may have all they need to diagnose children with suspected fractures of the distal forearm.

Researchers in Europe have combined ultrafast ultrasound with electroencephalography (EEG) to localize seizure sites in the brain microvasculature of newborn babies whose cortexes had developed abnormally.

MR enterography is an excellent performer when it comes to diagnosing active inflammation in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially at the per-patient (vs. per-lesion) level, according to a literature review conducted in South Korea and published online Oct. 9 in JAMA Pediatrics.

The effects of Zika virus on fetuses can be better analyzed using MRI over ultrasound as the imaging modality. According to ongoing research by the Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C., MRI provides more detailed images that reveal more extensive areas of damage to the developing fetal brain.

Lumbar MRI is a high performer when it comes to presenting pediatric radiologists with images aimed at confirming or ruling out spondylolysis, a common cause of low back pain among young athletes.

 

Recent Headlines

POCUS up to the task of finding, ruling out pediatric forearm fractures

Emergency physicians armed with point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) may have all they need to diagnose children with suspected fractures of the distal forearm.

NYU study involves CT findings in diagnosing cecal volvulus

A recent study conducted by four radiologists at New York University assessed the utility of CT features in the detection and official diagnosis of cecal volvulus.

Ultrasound helps find seizure sites in neonatal brains

Researchers in Europe have combined ultrafast ultrasound with electroencephalography (EEG) to localize seizure sites in the brain microvasculature of newborn babies whose cortexes had developed abnormally.

Pediatric IBD patients imaged gently, accurately with MR enterography

MR enterography is an excellent performer when it comes to diagnosing active inflammation in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially at the per-patient (vs. per-lesion) level, according to a literature review conducted in South Korea and published online Oct. 9 in JAMA Pediatrics.

MRI outperforms ultrasound in Zika-affected fetuses

The effects of Zika virus on fetuses can be better analyzed using MRI over ultrasound as the imaging modality. According to ongoing research by the Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C., MRI provides more detailed images that reveal more extensive areas of damage to the developing fetal brain.

MRI important in reducing re-excision rates in surgical management of HG DCIS

A study in the European Journal of Radiology suggests MRI could be an important tool in reducing the re-excision rates in the management of high grade (HG) ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), when used in preoperative diagnosis and evaluation.

Lumbar MRI recommended over CT for diagnosing pediatric spondylolysis

Lumbar MRI is a high performer when it comes to presenting pediatric radiologists with images aimed at confirming or ruling out spondylolysis, a common cause of low back pain among young athletes.

Technologist educators could do more to get students active in professional orgs

Students training to become radiologic technologists in the U.S. could and probably should join at least one professional society, organization or association at the state or national level in order to optimize their access to up-to-date learning resources and opportunities. However, many accredited rad-tech education programs either don’t mandate such participation or give it sufficient financial support.

Children’s ERs choosing ultrasound over CT for tummy pain; general ERs encouraged to follow suit

Pediatric patients with nontraumatic abdominal pain are less likely to receive CT scans—and more likely to be imaged with ultrasound instead—in pediatric emergency departments than their peers taken to general emergency departments (EDs).

Paramedic-performed lung ultrasound deemed presently unfeasible

Patients experiencing respiratory distress are not well served by lung ultrasound administered by paramedics and remotely interpreted by emergency physicians, although this could change if training techniques advance along with telemedicine and ultrasound technologies.

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