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Diagnostic Imaging

 

In theory, having a mobile CT scanner available in a trauma resuscitation bay should save workup time over relying on a scanner near but not inside the bay. In reality, it doesn’t make a meaningful difference.

Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) in the macrocyclic category have proven safe enough in children to be considered the standard of care across pediatrics whenever contrast-enhanced MR imaging is indicated, according the authors of a European study published online June 21 in Radiology.

First-year medical students at a historically black university in the nation’s capital are getting a deep introduction to the basics of radiology.

Practical and noninvasive, MRI with arterial spin labeling may substitute for PET-CT with the radiotracer 18FDG, which requires intravenous injection, for imaging the brains of patients with suspected early-stage dementia.

Benzodiazepines—the family of popular sedatives that includes Valium, Xanax and such—seem to bring about structural changes in the brain, according to a European study running in the August edition of Psychiatry Neuroimaging.

 

Recent Headlines

Mobile CT inside trauma bay no faster than the CT next door

In theory, having a mobile CT scanner available in a trauma resuscitation bay should save workup time over relying on a scanner near but not inside the bay. In reality, it doesn’t make a meaningful difference.

No measurable gadolinium in children’s brains even after multiple doses

Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) in the macrocyclic category have proven safe enough in children to be considered the standard of care across pediatrics whenever contrast-enhanced MR imaging is indicated, according the authors of a European study published online June 21 in Radiology.

Medical school adds radiology component to year-1 anatomy instruction

First-year medical students at a historically black university in the nation’s capital are getting a deep introduction to the basics of radiology.

Nimble MRI compares well with established PET-CT in dementia neuroimaging

Practical and noninvasive, MRI with arterial spin labeling may substitute for PET-CT with the radiotracer 18FDG, which requires intravenous injection, for imaging the brains of patients with suspected early-stage dementia.

Anti-anxiety medications change the brain

Benzodiazepines—the family of popular sedatives that includes Valium, Xanax and such—seem to bring about structural changes in the brain, according to a European study running in the August edition of Psychiatry Neuroimaging.

Aging women suffer more lumbar disc degeneration, MRI study shows

Lumbar MRI for low-back pain may be under constant suspicion of overutilization, but findings from a Chinese study suggest it’s often appropriate for a very substantial subset of the general population: postmenopausal women.

Elevated amyloid proves a warning sign of cognitive decline to come

People with elevated amyloid levels in the brain but no signs of cognitive decline are indeed more likely to develop impairment down the road, potentially leading to full-on Alzheimer’s, according to a study published online June 12 in JAMA.

Prenatal alcohol exposure changes babies’ faces, suggesting possible neuro effects

Mothers-to-be who drink alcohol, even in modest amounts, are putting their babies at risk of facial changes—and the differences may point to effects in the brain.

Cranial ultrasound a gentle, accurate choice for imaging infants with suspected skull defect

An Italian study published online June 3 in Child’s Nervous System shows that cranial ultrasound is a highly specific and sensitive first-step choice for imaging infants who show signs of craniosynostosis. That’s the birth defect in which the plates of the skull fuse too early, causing abnormal head shape and potentially putting injurious pressure on the brain.

Survey: Rad residency programs must sharpen efforts to draw women, engage med students

New female doctors applying for residency openings in radiology have different reasons for doing so than their male peers, and their priorities may challenge residency-program directors who’ve been trusting the conventional wisdom on things like work-life balance trumping career goals.  

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