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Diagnostic Imaging

 

SPECT imaging of the brain is used for gathering information on dopamine activity when it comes to monitoring patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Results from a new prospective clinical trial showed that a blood test looking at specific biomarkers was able to detect lung cancer recurrence about six months before conventional imaging methods found recurrence.

As word has gotten around that macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are more stable than linear GBCAs, and thus less likely to deposit in the brain, use of the former type has increased. However, in pediatric settings, at least, much education still needs to be directed to rads and referrers, according to the authors of a study published online March 10 in Pediatric Radiology.

Confirmation of a mesothelioma diagnosis can be difficult—and this alone is only a small portion of the treatment timeline. Physicians use x-rays, MRIs, CT scans and PET scans during the early stages of diagnosis when a patient notices symptoms.  

Calling on ultrasound-trained medical students to perform point-of-care scans in the emergency department can be a workable way to obtain accurate diagnoses and ensure appropriate patient management, according to a study published online March 3 in the Journal of Emergency Medicine.

 

Recent Headlines

Is SPECT imaging accurate in predicting nigral neurons in Parkinson's patients?

SPECT imaging of the brain is used for gathering information on dopamine activity when it comes to monitoring patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Fluid in the lungs being measured by a new technique using ultrasound

Medical researchers and engineers from North Carolina State University have found a new approach that uses ultrasound to measure fluid levels in the lungs.

Blood test able to detect lung cancer recurrence months before imaging

Results from a new prospective clinical trial showed that a blood test looking at specific biomarkers was able to detect lung cancer recurrence about six months before conventional imaging methods found recurrence.

Diagnostic imaging varies in evaluation of patients with appendicitis at children's hospitals

study published in the Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) found variations across children’s hospitals in regards to diagnostic imaging when evaluating patients with appendicitis. These distinctions were due to the variations in hospital-level resources.

Noninvasive imaging has high value in predicting major adverse cardiac event

Researchers from John Hopkins have found that using a combination of noninvasive CT angiography and stress tests could help to predict which patients are at risk of suffering a heart attack or other adverse cardiovascular event.

Pediatric MR imagers switching to more stable gadolinium contrast agent

As word has gotten around that macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are more stable than linear GBCAs, and thus less likely to deposit in the brain, use of the former type has increased. However, in pediatric settings, at least, much education still needs to be directed to rads and referrers, according to the authors of a study published online March 10 in Pediatric Radiology.

Imaging roles when diagnosing mesothelioma

Confirmation of a mesothelioma diagnosis can be difficult—and this alone is only a small portion of the treatment timeline. Physicians use x-rays, MRIs, CT scans and PET scans during the early stages of diagnosis when a patient notices symptoms.  

Medical students performing emergency ultrasound scans boost care quality

Calling on ultrasound-trained medical students to perform point-of-care scans in the emergency department can be a workable way to obtain accurate diagnoses and ensure appropriate patient management, according to a study published online March 3 in the Journal of Emergency Medicine.

Researchers use MRI to link CSF flow in infants to autism

A team of University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers found many toddlers diagnosed with autism at 2 years old had a substantially more extra-axial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at 6 and 12 months of age, before diagnosis is possible.

Researchers call for kicking ‘iodine allergy’ out of medical imaging

Designating radiology patients with the imprecise diagnosis “iodine allergy” may be dangerous, as it could lead to unnecessarily unenhanced scans as well as uncertainty in clinical management and sometimes even useless preventative measures.

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