Advanced Viz Techniques Follow Cards into the Peripheries

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Chris P. Kaiser, Editor

Advanced visualization techniques are not just for the coronary arteries. In fact, 3D visualization is advantageous in any part of the circulation, from the circle of Willis to the plantar arteries. Our first top story demonstrates the value of 3D CT venography to better prepare for varicose vein surgery.

The 3D technique for varicose veins is not a substitute for Doppler sonography. The anatomic information gained through advanced 3D CT imaging complements the functional information gleaned from ultrasound. The 3D images help detect abnormalities of the deep calf veins and enable the complete visualization of the disease, to provide surgeons a roadmap when planning an intervention that may better prevent recurrence.

In our second top story, we go to the carotids to examine a 3D MRI technique that can help characterize vulnerable plaque. The study found excellent agreement between the MR-identified intraplaque hemorrhage and that seen in carotid endarterectomy specimens.

The next step is to validate this noninvasive advanced visualization technique as a triage tool for high-risk patients and to monitor their pre- and post-interventions. In fact, a trial is in the works to test the 3D MRI technique with patients who receive carotid stents.  

I’d like to direct your attention to one of our featured stories regarding the impending move toward mandatory accreditation to perform cardiac imaging, particularly for advanced modalities such as CT, MRI and PET. It’s no longer a question of ‘if,’ but ‘when,’ as some private insurers have mandated the requirement and government has seriously considered the action.

To find out more about the technology options available for advanced visualization, be sure to stop by our Healthcare TechGuide for an overview of offerings available from a variety of developers.

And what would advanced imaging and visualization be without the ability to store, archive and manipulate-on-demand all those images? To find out how you can better deal with this, you can access our archived webcast, “Cardiology PACS & CVIS: Implementing Digital Strategies.”

On these or any topics regarding advanced visualization, feel free to drop me a comment.

Chris P. Kaiser, Editor