Baptist Health expands cardiac, thoracic group

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Baptist Health is expanding its cardiovascular surgery program with new hires at the cardiac and thoracic surgical group.

Joining the new group, under Baptist’s chief of cardiothoracic surgery Niberto Moreno, MD, are Lynn Harrison, MD, clinical director of cardiac surgery; Lynn Seto, MD, director of cardiac robotic surgery; Mark Dylewski, MD, director of general thoracic surgery and thoracic surgical oncology, and Lisardo Garcia-Covarrubias, MD.

Moreno specializes in beating-heart surgery, in which the heart is allowed to continue to pump blood to the body while intricate operating techniques are used by the surgeon. He did the first beating heart operation in South Florida in 1994 and the first minimally invasive aortic and mitral valve surgeries in 1993. He has been affiliated with Baptist for 22 years, joining the medical staff at Baptist and South Miami Hospitals in 1987.

Harrison joins Baptist from the University of Massachusetts, where he was chief of the division of cardiac surgery. He came to UMass from Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans, where he served as a professor of surgery and chief of cardiothoracic surgery.

Seto comes to Baptist from Cleveland Clinic. Her specialty is robotic and minimally invasive cardiac surgery, particularly mitral valve repair. At Cleveland Clinic, she performed 400 heart surgeries without a fatality.

Dylewski has been affiliated with Baptist since 2004, and focuses on robotic techniques, particularly minimally invasive lung surgery. Prior to joining Baptist, he served as associate director of thoracic surgery and assistant professor of thoracic surgery at Georgetown University Hospital and Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C.

Garcia-Covarrubias joins Baptist after extensive post-graduate training. He completed a cardiothoracic transplant fellowship at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center following a thoracic surgery residency and transplant fellowship at the University of Miami-Jackson Memorial Hospital, where he was chief administrative cardiothoracic resident.