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Imaging

 

According to a new study published in Academic Radiology, in ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scans, a large matrix size maintains the spatial resolution and improves the image quality and assessment of lung diseases when compared to a 512-matrix size.  

Sitting for long periods of time may contribute to greater amounts of fat deposited around one's internal organs, according to a new study published in December issue of Obesity.  

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a new guidance on Jan. 9 warning that the lowest radiation dose possible should be used for pediatric patient X-ray exams. 

One unmistakable topic at RSNA 2017 was virtual and augmented reality—and how advancements will affect medicine. With numerous presentations and interactive booths at the annual conference in Chicago, the technologies are clearly growing in popularity in interventional radiology and health imaging. 

Researchers in China have discovered that depression and social anxiety cause noticeable structural abnormalities in the brain, according to a recent release from the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

 

Recent Headlines

How large matrices improve quality in ultra-high-resolution CT

According to a new study published in Academic Radiology, in ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scans, a large matrix size maintains the spatial resolution and improves the image quality and assessment of lung diseases when compared to a 512-matrix size.  

MRI shows sitting for too long can increase fat around organs

Sitting for long periods of time may contribute to greater amounts of fat deposited around one's internal organs, according to a new study published in December issue of Obesity.  

FDA issues guidance for lowest possible radiation dose for pediatric x-rays

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a new guidance on Jan. 9 warning that the lowest radiation dose possible should be used for pediatric patient X-ray exams. 

RSNA 2017: Virtual, augmented reality may revolutionize medical imaging

One unmistakable topic at RSNA 2017 was virtual and augmented reality—and how advancements will affect medicine. With numerous presentations and interactive booths at the annual conference in Chicago, the technologies are clearly growing in popularity in interventional radiology and health imaging. 

New MRI research discovers depression, anxiety change the brain

Researchers in China have discovered that depression and social anxiety cause noticeable structural abnormalities in the brain, according to a recent release from the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Hartford HealthCare’s ImageConnect Project: How Strategy, Growth and a VNA Made It Happen

Hartford HealthCare is Connecticut’s most comprehensive healthcare network. Over the last several years, this community and academic health system has grown significantly through its strategic affiliations with hospitals and a variety of providers. To support that growth, the health system brought on a Sectra Vendor Neutral Archive (VNA) to manage inpatient and ambulatory medical images across the enterprise. Image access and archiving became a strategic priority—initiated and dubbed the ImageConnect Project by Interventional Radiologist Barry Stein, MD, to guarantee physician access anywhere and anytime via their Epic EMR, says Richard Shirey, senior vice president and CIO and 40-year healthcare veteran whose task it was to execute on the project. Today IT is driving full enterprise access to patient images and information.

The pros, cons of social media in health communications

According to statistics, roughly two billion people worldwide are social media users, with that number expected to double by 2018. So why might there be little attention on social media in health communications?  

Fujifilm to unveil new pediatric solutions at RSNA 2017 in Chicago

At RSNA 2017 in Chicago, FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc., is unveiling its brand new suite of solutions for pediatric patients. Each solution was designed specifically to combat the challenges associated with treating children while focusing on efficiency, low radiation dose and convenience.

Long-view digital radiography improving the lives of pediatric orthopedic patients

The Radiology Department at Driscoll Children’s Hospital in Corpus Christi, Texas, didn’t need a nudge from Washington, D.C., to upgrade to digital radiography (DR). With one exception, the department’s x-ray rooms were fully DR-capable as of last year; Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) said it would start reducing payments for analog X-ray in 2017 and for computed radiography (CR) in 2018.

Small yet mighty mammography center becomes a 3D leader

She did it once then and she’s done it again. In 1989, Mary Lou Catania, RN, brought modern mammography to the women of California’s Monterey Peninsula when she founded the Mammography Center of Monterey. It was a bold move: She had limited resources and no direct experience working in radiology, much less running a business. What she did have was her own need to be screened for breast cancer—and her realization that the only technology offered locally was old-and-fading, xeromammography.

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