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Neuroimaging

 

According to a study recently published in the February issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology, researchers from South Korea have found an alternative to conventional MRI in pediatric patients who can't restrict their movement during imaging. 

Physical activity sustains gray matter volume in the brain of older adults, according to recent findings from Rush University Medical Center researchers in Chicago.  

Researchers from King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience and the University of Roehampton in London have found a way to suppress verbal hallucinations in individuals with schizophrenia through video games. 

The sound of music can speak to one's soul in myriad ways. Musical genres can also affect the brain in varying ways.

According to recent findings published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Yale University researchers have found that people with type 1 diabetes miss low blood sugar cues from the body compared with healthy adults because of differences in neurological reactions and stimulation.  

 

Recent Headlines

GE, NFL and Under Armour launch $60M Head Health Initiative

Representatives from GE, the National Football League (NFL) and sporting apparel company Under Armour, along with a panel of experts on traumatic brain injuries, today announced the Head Health Initiative, a four-year, $60 million collaboration to speed diagnosis and improve treatment of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

Red state, blue state: fMRI predicts party ID

Liberals and conservatives use different parts of the brain when assessing risks, and activity in these regions can be used to predict political party identification, according to a study published Feb. 13 in PLOS ONE.

MRI spots brain abnormalities in veterans with TBI

Soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) have measurable abnormalities in the white matter of their brains, according to a study published online in December in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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