SNMMI 2012 Image of the Year award unveiled

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molecular imaging - 200.52 Kb
SNM 2012 Image of the Year: Response of multiple liver lesions after i.a. therapy with 14 GBq Bi-213-DOTATOC.
Source: Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) has selected its 2012 Image of the Year. This year’s winner illustrates the effectiveness of Bi-213-DOTATOC for the peptide receptor alpha-therapy of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) that do not respond to beta therapy.

Researchers selected the winner from more than 2,000 studies presented over the course of SNMMI’s 2012 Annual Meeting in Miami.

SNMMI’s Image of the Year award recognizes an image that “exemplifies the most cutting-edge nuclear medicine or molecular imaging research today and that demonstrates the ability of molecular imaging to detect and diagnose disease and help select the most appropriate therapy,” according to the society.

The winning study was led by Alfred Morgenstern, PhD, project leader of the Alpha-Immunotherapy Project at the European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements in Karlsruhe, Germany. “The images illustrate the potential of Ga-68-DOTATOC PET and PET/CT to assess the therapeutic effects we can achieve in multiresistant neuroendocrine tumors with Bi-213-DOTATOC,” Morgenstern said in a release. “It’s very exciting to see that peptide receptor alpha therapy with Bi-213-DOTATOC is offering a promising novel therapeutic option for patients refractory to existing therapies.”

molecular imaging - 152.69 Kb
2012 SNM Image of the Year: Shrinkage of the liver lesions and bone metastases after i.a. therapy with 11 GBq Bi-213-DOTATOC.
Source: Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

GEP-NETs develop in the digestive system and are distributed throughout the body. They are often resistant to standard chemotherapy. The National Cancer Institute estimates about 1,000 new cases of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors per year in the U.S.