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Practice Management

 

Emory University neuroscientist Gregory Berns led a team of researchers who found that when using fMRI to scan canine candidates to assist people with disabilities, images would help predict which dogs would be unfit for a rigorous service training program.

Patients rating their satisfaction with radiology departments may be more swayed by the courtesy of the receptionist and the cleanliness of the area than by any part of getting imaged or interacting with clinicians. And they’re more likely to let you know about it by electronic kiosk than by online survey. 

Seven health systems across the country are launching education and training programs thanks to a partnership between AHRA: The Association for Medical Imaging Management and Toshiba Medical. The ninth annual Putting Patients First grants fund development programs ranging from less invasive ultrasounds to diagnose pediatric appendicitis to imaging appropriateness training to reduce patient dose and improve workflow. 

While designed to flag threats to patient safety, hospitals’ incident reporting systems can do double duty as monitors of conflicts between healthcare workers, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in PLoS One.

Citing recent studies that have shown workplace bullying is all too common in radiology and radiation oncology, three members of American College of Radiology (ACR)’s human resources commission are suggesting steps to cut off the problem at its root. 

 

Recent Headlines

fMRI used to predict dogs not fit for service training

Emory University neuroscientist Gregory Berns led a team of researchers who found that when using fMRI to scan canine candidates to assist people with disabilities, images would help predict which dogs would be unfit for a rigorous service training program.

New registry launches for interventional radiology

Interventional radiologists have a new way to compare their work with that of their peers and see how it stacks up against performance benchmarks set at the national, regional and practice level. 

Radiology patients keen on cleanliness, front-desk courtesy

Patients rating their satisfaction with radiology departments may be more swayed by the courtesy of the receptionist and the cleanliness of the area than by any part of getting imaged or interacting with clinicians. And they’re more likely to let you know about it by electronic kiosk than by online survey. 

AHRA, Toshiba award grants for 'Putting Patients First'

Seven health systems across the country are launching education and training programs thanks to a partnership between AHRA: The Association for Medical Imaging Management and Toshiba Medical. The ninth annual Putting Patients First grants fund development programs ranging from less invasive ultrasounds to diagnose pediatric appendicitis to imaging appropriateness training to reduce patient dose and improve workflow. 

Hospital researchers propose using safety reports to track workplace run-ins

While designed to flag threats to patient safety, hospitals’ incident reporting systems can do double duty as monitors of conflicts between healthcare workers, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in PLoS One.

6 actions radiology leaders can take to help banish bullying

Citing recent studies that have shown workplace bullying is all too common in radiology and radiation oncology, three members of American College of Radiology (ACR)’s human resources commission are suggesting steps to cut off the problem at its root. 

Online bests print at informing patients on imaging radiation—but neither shines at busting a certain myth

Patients readily assimilate information on radiation risks in medical imaging when the facts are presented interactively and online. In fact, in a new study, the electronic medium beat printed materials at helping patients understand ionizing radiation, know which imaging modalities use it—and even correctly rank the modalities by the relative radiation amounts each one emits. 

Lead aprons block radiation exposure all right, but they also invite lead poisoning

A study of lead shields used during x-ray and fluoroscopy procedures at an academic medical center in New York City showed that nearly two-thirds of the shields had detectable lead dust on the surface. The finding has prompted the study authors to urge all imaging departments and centers to switch to lead-free shielding materials. 

Self-examination is crucial before making drastic MACRA-related changes

It’s official: The reporting window for MACRA has begun. While CMS has eased the reporting requirements for 2017, calling it a transition year, practices aiming for full participation still need to report all of the required measurements for a continuous period of at least 90 days. In fact, groups looking to maximize their chances of a positive adjustment should report as much data as possible, according to CMS.

Group working steadily to increase the visibility—and number—of women in radiology

Female radiologists have made strides increasing their presence and visibility over the 35 years since the 1981 founding of the American Association for Women Radiologists (AAWR). However, their numbers continue to lag far behind those of their male counterparts, especially in leadership positions. 

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