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Practice Management

 

Emergency radiologists who work lots of overnight shifts and/or shifts longer than nine hours tend to feel less healthy, closer to burnout and more dissatisfied with their work than emergency rads who have more humane schedules, according to a study published online Dec. 4 in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. 

With long hours, seamlessly never-ending workloads and frequent isolation, radiologists are increasingly experiencing burnout. It’s a problem that can have serious effects on one’s work if not addressed properly. But considering the nature of the business, burnout can be hard to prevent and manage within realistic limits of the profession.

James Rawson, MD, radiology chair at Augusta University in Augusta, Georgia, has a lot of experience with developing relationships between new recruits and those who are more established in the field of radiology. On Thursday, Dec. 1, Rawson will discuss the importance of developing future leaders in radiology in a presentation titled, “Mentors, Mentees and Mentoring in Radiology.” 

Though radiologists spend a majority of their time interpreting images behind a computer screen, proper communication with both referring physicians and patients still plays a significant role in providing the best care possible.

Too many radiologists think only about dose reduction when they hear “radiology” and “patient safety” in the same sentence, according to Ehsan Samei, PhD, professor of radiology at Duke University.

 

Recent Headlines

Heavy overnight shifting takes a toll on emergency rads, although some prefer its payoffs

Emergency radiologists who work lots of overnight shifts and/or shifts longer than nine hours tend to feel less healthy, closer to burnout and more dissatisfied with their work than emergency rads who have more humane schedules, according to a study published online Dec. 4 in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. 

RSNA 2016: Radiologist burnout is real; here's how to fix it

With long hours, seamlessly never-ending workloads and frequent isolation, radiologists are increasingly experiencing burnout. It’s a problem that can have serious effects on one’s work if not addressed properly. But considering the nature of the business, burnout can be hard to prevent and manage within realistic limits of the profession.

Mentoring programs can help build the future of radiology

James Rawson, MD, radiology chair at Augusta University in Augusta, Georgia, has a lot of experience with developing relationships between new recruits and those who are more established in the field of radiology. On Thursday, Dec. 1, Rawson will discuss the importance of developing future leaders in radiology in a presentation titled, “Mentors, Mentees and Mentoring in Radiology.” 

New immunotherapy cancer vaccine to be tested in clinical trial

A new immunotherapy cancer vaccine meant to treat patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is being tested in a clinical trial.

RSNA 2016: Knowing the importance of communication between radiologists, physicians, patients

Though radiologists spend a majority of their time interpreting images behind a computer screen, proper communication with both referring physicians and patients still plays a significant role in providing the best care possible.

RSNA 2016: Radiologists must find dosing’s sweet spot to optimize patient safety

Too many radiologists think only about dose reduction when they hear “radiology” and “patient safety” in the same sentence, according to Ehsan Samei, PhD, professor of radiology at Duke University.

RSNA 2016: Social media and radiology are a perfect match

Social media is everywhere these days, and this quick and easy method of communication is being utilized across the country in almost every industry. 

Taking a Comprehensive Approach to Customer Satisfaction

For over 40 consecutive quarters—from the mid-2000s to 2016—Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas has been ranked as the  #1 Computed Radiography (CR) manufacturer for customer satisfaction by MD Buyline, an independent organization that provides hospitals and health systems with evidence-based research and consulting services to advise hospitals on critical purchasing decisions.

10 tips: How and why to hold a radiology-based ‘readiness huddle’ each and every day

From hospital-system sprawl to e-health screen staring, today’s modes of healthcare delivery often end up keeping radiology-department members and stakeholders from collaborating with one another in person. At Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston, the imaging department is defying these currents. 

New cancer drug approved to treat leukemia

A new cancer-fighting drug meant to help treat leukemia and solid tumors was approved by the European Union. 

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