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Practice Management

 

Radiologists reading digital imaging exams move their mouses much more and tap their keypads far less than computer-bound nonradiologist workers, and that’s just one of several factors contributing to the rise of repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) in radiologists.

Radiology trainees giving second reads to experienced radiologists’ image-interpretation reports can significantly reduce the use of post-script corrections, amplifications or clarifications—i.e., addenda.

Searching three years’ worth of physicians’ notes in their academic medical center’s EMR, researchers at NYU Langone found that many informal consultations between referrers and radiologists had been captured incompletely or inadequately, with potential implications for patient management. In a paper published online in the American Journal of Roentgenology, they recommend radiology practices draw up policies to head off such communications lapses.

Upon examining various performance metrics on their MRI patient throughput, members of the radiology department at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found they were losing close to one-third of their time to delays, bottlenecks or other avoidable inefficiencies.

After implementing an established rule for selecting head CT for trauma patients, a 13-site set of Kaiser Permanente community EDs in Southern California reduced avoidable head CT utilization by 5.3 percent while improving their performance on injury identification, according to a study published online July 21 in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

 

Recent Headlines

3 ways radiologists can fend off repetitive stress injury

Radiologists reading digital imaging exams move their mouses much more and tap their keypads far less than computer-bound nonradiologist workers, and that’s just one of several factors contributing to the rise of repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) in radiologists.

Radiology trainees can cut rates of radiology-report addenda, adding value to patient care

Radiology trainees giving second reads to experienced radiologists’ image-interpretation reports can significantly reduce the use of post-script corrections, amplifications or clarifications—i.e., addenda.

Siemens softens advice on hacker-vulnerable imaging systems

Following last week’s advisory from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security warning that four medical-imaging systems made by Siemens may be vulnerable to cyberattack, the company has announced it will issue software fixes by the end of this month.

Documentation of radiologist-referrer consults found lacking

Searching three years’ worth of physicians’ notes in their academic medical center’s EMR, researchers at NYU Langone found that many informal consultations between referrers and radiologists had been captured incompletely or inadequately, with potential implications for patient management. In a paper published online in the American Journal of Roentgenology, they recommend radiology practices draw up policies to head off such communications lapses.

Radiology department diagnoses its own MRI inefficiencies, prescribes remedies

Upon examining various performance metrics on their MRI patient throughput, members of the radiology department at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found they were losing close to one-third of their time to delays, bottlenecks or other avoidable inefficiencies.

Community EDs cut needless trauma CT using Canadian rule

After implementing an established rule for selecting head CT for trauma patients, a 13-site set of Kaiser Permanente community EDs in Southern California reduced avoidable head CT utilization by 5.3 percent while improving their performance on injury identification, according to a study published online July 21 in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

ACR updates contrast-media guide

Spotlighting fresh content on administering contrast to pregnant patients, updated patient-selection strategies and an entirely new chapter on contrast-enhanced ultrasound, the American College of Radiology on July 12 announced the latest version of its Manual on Contrast Media.

AHRA 2017 preview: Quality work rewarded is quality work repeated—and emulated

Numerous studies and surveys have shown that U.S. workers in every field, including healthcare, derive more job satisfaction from being recognized for a job well done than from any other top-down motivator. Not even a pay raise goes as far. Of course, turning that insight into action across a large radiology department takes a little doing.

AHRA 2017 preview: Be mindful with social media

Social media can be a boon to healthcare workers and the provider institutions they work for—but it can just as easily be a bust. Just ask the nursing students expelled from school for posting “hilarious” x-rays of an anonymous emergency patient with a foreign object lodged inside a body cavity. The students committed no HIPAA violation, just a breach in basic ethics. But the lapse was enough to derail a couple of promising careers before they even began.

Structured reporting increases ‘normal’—but ‘unremarkable’ persists

Implementing structured reporting templates has helped an academic radiology department increase its collective use of the clear and definitive term normal. However, use of the fuzzier term unremarkable also went up, suggesting more training may be in order.

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