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Quality

 

With allegations of sexual misconduct flooding recent headlines, a study presented at RSNA 2017 examining how radiology can offer clues in cases of identifying domestic abuse and sexual assault proved especially relevant.  

According to the 2015 report from the Institute of Medicine "Improving Diagnosis in Health Care," every person with access to healthcare will experience at least one diagnostic error in her lifetime. The diagnostic process for clinicians can be complex and requires collaboration between patients, clinicians and healthcare providers to provide the best treatment plan. There remains room for improvement in reducing diagnostic error, as discussed during a Nov. 28 session at RSNA 2017 in Chicago.

When it comes to inserting cannulas in the radial arteries of pediatric CCU patients, ultrasound guidance is superior to manual palpation, according to a study running in the December edition of the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine.

What determines value in medicine will differ based on specialty, but what should radiologists consider when trying to maximize value in imaging? "The Value of Imaging," a Nov. 26 session at RSNA 2017 in Chicago, aimed to provide answers.

Health Imaging spoke with RSNA President Richard Ehman, MD, professor of radiology and Blanche R. & Richard J. Erlanger Professor of Medical Research at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, to discuss a few final thoughts about RSNA 2017 in Chicago, which ended Thurs., Nov. 30. 

 

Recent Headlines

RSNA 2017: How radiology can help uncover evidence of domestic abuse, sexual assault

With allegations of sexual misconduct flooding recent headlines, a study presented at RSNA 2017 examining how radiology can offer clues in cases of identifying domestic abuse and sexual assault proved especially relevant.  

RSNA 2017: Understanding error, potential improvements in the diagnostic process

According to the 2015 report from the Institute of Medicine "Improving Diagnosis in Health Care," every person with access to healthcare will experience at least one diagnostic error in her lifetime. The diagnostic process for clinicians can be complex and requires collaboration between patients, clinicians and healthcare providers to provide the best treatment plan. There remains room for improvement in reducing diagnostic error, as discussed during a Nov. 28 session at RSNA 2017 in Chicago.

Ultrasound guidance beats clinician’s touch for pediatric cannula placement

When it comes to inserting cannulas in the radial arteries of pediatric CCU patients, ultrasound guidance is superior to manual palpation, according to a study running in the December edition of the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine.

RSNA 2017: Final thoughts with RSNA President Richard Ehman, MD

Health Imaging spoke with RSNA President Richard Ehman, MD, professor of radiology and Blanche R. & Richard J. Erlanger Professor of Medical Research at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, to discuss a few final thoughts about RSNA 2017 in Chicago, which ended Thurs., Nov. 30. 

RSNA 2017: Economics, quality, tech regulations determine value of imaging

What determines value in medicine will differ based on specialty, but what should radiologists consider when trying to maximize value in imaging? "The Value of Imaging," a Nov. 26 session at RSNA 2017 in Chicago, aimed to provide answers.

Wide gap found between ER provider, patient perceptions of radiation dose discussions

The disconnect over CT radiation discussions between emergency-room providers and the patients they serve may be wider than expected in the Image Wisely era. At one site, a new survey has shown that more than three-quarters of providers thought they’d routinely discussed radiation doses with CT patients—while fewer than one-quarter of patients said they’d been so informed.

Direct patient access to radiology reports: Up for debate

Should patients be able to receive their radiology reports directly from radiologists? Or should they only be allowed access when chaperoned by a qualified medical professional? Two experts holding opposing views on the matter go toe-to-toe in articles published online in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Radiology trainees can cut rates of radiology-report addenda, adding value to patient care

Radiology trainees giving second reads to experienced radiologists’ image-interpretation reports can significantly reduce the use of post-script corrections, amplifications or clarifications—i.e., addenda.

AHRA 2017 preview: Quality work rewarded is quality work repeated—and emulated

Numerous studies and surveys have shown that U.S. workers in every field, including healthcare, derive more job satisfaction from being recognized for a job well done than from any other top-down motivator. Not even a pay raise goes as far. Of course, turning that insight into action across a large radiology department takes a little doing.

Structured reporting increases ‘normal’—but ‘unremarkable’ persists

Implementing structured reporting templates has helped an academic radiology department increase its collective use of the clear and definitive term normal. However, use of the fuzzier term unremarkable also went up, suggesting more training may be in order.

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