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Women's Imaging

 

By combining virtual bone-strength testing with standard bone mineral density testing—the former using quantitative CT, the latter with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA)—clinicians can help postmenopausal women ward off a substantial number of painful fragility fractures.

At one busy, academically affiliated breast center in the Northeast U.S., the so-called “Angelina Jolie Effect”—women being motivated by the celebrity to get screened for breast cancer—isn’t a thing.

Annual screening mammography adds no value to women who are high risk for breast cancer and, as a matter of course, are already getting screened each year with breast MRI, according to a study conducted at the University of Toronto and published online June 6 in Radiology.

Reviewing screening breast MRI data from six regional Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) registries representing 49 facilities, researchers have found breast rads performing quite impressively in their respective communities: Their interpretive accuracy from 2005 to 2013 met most BI-RADS benchmarks that are based on expert practice in clinical trials.

Women undergoing percutaneous breast biopsy experience less pain and discomfort when the procedure is guided by ultrasound than by stereotactic mammography with vacuum assistance, according to a Canadian study published online May 22 in European Radiology.

 

Recent Headlines

Screening bone CT helps avoid osteoporosis fractures

By combining virtual bone-strength testing with standard bone mineral density testing—the former using quantitative CT, the latter with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA)—clinicians can help postmenopausal women ward off a substantial number of painful fragility fractures.

Is breast cancer overdiagnosed or isn’t it? The argument goes on

People taking sides in the mammography debates have a fresh controversy to feed on. This one has some Ivy League heft—and a pointed statement from the American College of Radiology—behind it.

Test for evidence of the ‘Angelina Effect’ comes back negative

At one busy, academically affiliated breast center in the Northeast U.S., the so-called “Angelina Jolie Effect”—women being motivated by the celebrity to get screened for breast cancer—isn’t a thing.

Researchers call for making breast MRI a standalone screening exam

Annual screening mammography adds no value to women who are high risk for breast cancer and, as a matter of course, are already getting screened each year with breast MRI, according to a study conducted at the University of Toronto and published online June 6 in Radiology.

Breast rads meeting, beating or approaching BI-RADS benchmarks for screening MRI

Reviewing screening breast MRI data from six regional Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) registries representing 49 facilities, researchers have found breast rads performing quite impressively in their respective communities: Their interpretive accuracy from 2005 to 2013 met most BI-RADS benchmarks that are based on expert practice in clinical trials.

Ultrasound breast biopsy beats stereotactic counterpart on patient experience

Women undergoing percutaneous breast biopsy experience less pain and discomfort when the procedure is guided by ultrasound than by stereotactic mammography with vacuum assistance, according to a Canadian study published online May 22 in European Radiology.

Up-and-coming ultrasound technology shows prowess as mammography adjunct

The emerging imaging technology called quantitative transmission (QT) ultrasound has shown its utility as an aid in distinguishing cysts from solid lesions in the breast, according to a study published online May 23 in Academic Radiology.

Fixed date, time for backup appointment improve attendance for women who miss breast cancer screening

Participation in breast cancer screening has declined in England. A new analysis revealed women who miss a first breast screening appointment and are given a fixed date for another appointment are more likely to attend that backup.

Minimally invasive ultrasound-guided biopsy a fine diagnostic for nonpalpable breast lesions

Breast lesions that physicians can’t feel by palpation are little match for fine-needle aspiration guided by ultrasound, although the procedure’s performance varies somewhat with the age of the patient and the BI-RADS category of the lesion.

Regional survey underscores need for more radiologist education on breast density

Many practicing radiologists share the general public’s sense of befuddlement over state-level breast density legislation and its implications for patient care, at least in New England, according to a study published online May 8 in Academic Radiology.

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