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Women's Imaging

 

A third of breast-cancer patients undergoing preoperative mammography and ultrasound would be more accurately imaged for tumor size with breast MRI, according to a study published online April 13 in the Journal of Surgical Oncology. 

When women are recalled from screening mammography for additional imaging, they may soon be as likely to get scanned with automated ultrasound as with handheld, for European researchers have found similar performance between the two. 

Reinterpretation of community breast studies by a specialized cancer center yielded a change in interpretation in some 28 percent of studies submitted for a second opinion during a four-month period, according to findings published online March 16 in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

MRI breast screening is an effective supplement to traditional mammography, even for women with an average risk of breast cancer, according to a study published in Radiology.

The mammography screening debates have been raging ever since 2009, when the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force began recommending that most women get screened every other year rather than every year and start their screenings at 50 rather than 40. A new study shows that, among women routinely participating in mammography screening, the recommendation has not lengthened the average interval between exam dates. 

 

Recent Headlines

Nebraska breast density bill signed into law

Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts signed Legislative Bill 195 into law today making it the 32nd state to enact mandatory breast density reporting.

 
‘Controversial’ preoperative breast MRI more accurate than mammography/ultrasound for many patients

A third of breast-cancer patients undergoing preoperative mammography and ultrasound would be more accurately imaged for tumor size with breast MRI, according to a study published online April 13 in the Journal of Surgical Oncology. 

Re-excision rates reduced with the help of digital breast tomosynthesis

Alessia Milan, PhD, MS, from the University of Turin in Italy, presented a study about digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) emerging as a promising technology when it comes to surgical planning, because it presents a better view of lesion margins than mammography alone.

Trailblazers: iCAD’s groundbreaking tomosynthesis CAD solution uses deep learning to reduce reading times

The growing influence of artificial intelligence and deep learning in healthcare has led some writers to theorize that certain specialties, including radiology, would soon be “replaced” by machines.

Automated breast ultrasound performs comparably to handheld

When women are recalled from screening mammography for additional imaging, they may soon be as likely to get scanned with automated ultrasound as with handheld, for European researchers have found similar performance between the two. 

Two-pronged approach may improve personalized breast cancer treatment

Researchers from multiple institutions have combined two methods of cancer detection to develop a new method in producing personalized breast cancer treatments. 

Cancer-center rads show the value of re-reading community breast exams

Reinterpretation of community breast studies by a specialized cancer center yielded a change in interpretation in some 28 percent of studies submitted for a second opinion during a four-month period, according to findings published online March 16 in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Mercy Medical System first in New York to install clinical LumaGEM MBI system

Gamma Medica announced that New York’s first clinical LumaGEM Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) system has been installed at Mercy Center, a member of Catholic Health Services of Long Island.

MRI breast screening: Not just for high-risk women

MRI breast screening is an effective supplement to traditional mammography, even for women with an average risk of breast cancer, according to a study published in Radiology.

Biennial breast-screening recommendation hasn’t moved the interval needle

The mammography screening debates have been raging ever since 2009, when the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force began recommending that most women get screened every other year rather than every year and start their screenings at 50 rather than 40. A new study shows that, among women routinely participating in mammography screening, the recommendation has not lengthened the average interval between exam dates. 

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