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Breast Imaging

 

For the last 10 years, researchers from the University of Texas MD Andersen Cancer Center have been compiling examples of when breast MRI may be helpful for male patients, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Diagnostic Radiology.  

False-positive stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsies (SVABs) may not negatively affect subsequent mammographic screenings, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR). The harms of false-positives, according to reserachers from the Center for Biomedical Imaging at New York University School of Medicine, may be exaggerated. 

Researchers from the Columbia University Medical Center have found additional breast imaging with ultrasound technology may be unnecessary after a patient receives a negative mammogram and has experienced symptoms of breast pain alone, according to a recent study published in Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology

According to a recent study published by JAMA, single-nucleotide polymorphisms SNP risk panels can improve predictions of breast cancer, ultimately benefitting women who would benefit from additional in-depth mammogram screenings.  

A recent study from the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) has found imaging surveillance follow-up appointments vary among breast cancer patients and survivors nationwide, suggesting a strong need for refinery and consistency.

 

Recent Headlines

Why breast MRI may be helpful to male patients, too

For the last 10 years, researchers from the University of Texas MD Andersen Cancer Center have been compiling examples of when breast MRI may be helpful for male patients, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Diagnostic Radiology.  

Study: Harms of false-positives in mammography may be exaggerated

False-positive stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsies (SVABs) may not negatively affect subsequent mammographic screenings, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR). The harms of false-positives, according to reserachers from the Center for Biomedical Imaging at New York University School of Medicine, may be exaggerated. 

Is additional breast imaging needed after a negative mammogram?

Researchers from the Columbia University Medical Center have found additional breast imaging with ultrasound technology may be unnecessary after a patient receives a negative mammogram and has experienced symptoms of breast pain alone, according to a recent study published in Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology

SNP risk panels can help predict breast cancer—here's how

According to a recent study published by JAMA, single-nucleotide polymorphisms SNP risk panels can improve predictions of breast cancer, ultimately benefitting women who would benefit from additional in-depth mammogram screenings.  

8 things to know about breast cancer screening for high-risk women

According to a recent study in the Journal of the American College of Radiology, the ACR recommends women at an average risk for breast cancer should begin annual mammograms at age 40. High-risk women should start mammograms even earlier. 

Breast cancer survivors reveal the best way to follow up with them

A recent study from the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) has found imaging surveillance follow-up appointments vary among breast cancer patients and survivors nationwide, suggesting a strong need for refinery and consistency.

4 findings suggesting gender inequalities extend into breast imaging

Breast imaging radiology is largely dominated by women, but despite the fact, a stark gender disparity in the academic field remains, according to an American Journal of Roentgenology study.

It takes 2: Screening, treatment halve breast cancer mortality in US

Breast cancer mortality rates in the U.S. have decreased by roughly 50 percent from 2000 to 2012, according to a new stimulation modeling study released online Jan. 9 by JAMA.

Should women stop getting mammograms? Imaging experts explain

The standard recommendation for a mammogram in the U.S. is once a woman is between the ages of 40 and 50, however a new article published by TIME reveals why some medical experts believe we should end mammograms altogether.  

Bi-annual MRI more effective than mammograms for high-risk young women

A new study conducted by researchers from the University of Chicago Medicine and the University of Washington, Seattle has demonstrated that young women at a genetically high risk of developing breast cancer would benefit more receiving bi-annual MRI exams rather than standard annual mammogram.  

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