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Breast Imaging

 

Breast lesions seldom turn up incidentally in abdominal MRI scans. However, when they do, quite a few turn out to be malignant. Accordingly, radiologists interpreting women’s abdominal MRIs should be on the lookout for breast abnormalities.

A new implant to treat women with breast cancer has been deemed effective by two independent studies, an encouraging development for the bioabsorbable marker branded as BioZorb.

As far as we’ve come in the fight against breast cancer over the past 20 years, the state of actionable information is, circa 2016, fairly accurately encapsulated by an old bromide that’s often dispatched to denigrate perceptions of progress: The more things change, the more they stay the same.

Clinicians evaluating women with nondense breasts who are experiencing focal breast pain will find little to no value adding directed ultrasound to digital mammography when the latter is indicated due to screening scheduling. 

Over the years since the advent of widespread screening mammography, overdiagnosis and overtreatment have become accepted as unfortunate but tolerable collateral troubles. There’s no shortage of literature using mathematical modeling to suggest as much. Now comes a new analysis of hard data, published Oct. 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine, to quantify the problem. 

 

Recent Headlines

Mammography more effective when compared to previous screenings

According to researchers at the University of California, the recall rate of screening mammography is greatly reduced when physicians compare present and past mammograms.

Breast lesions found incidentally on abdominal MRI shown cancerous at a considerable rate

Breast lesions seldom turn up incidentally in abdominal MRI scans. However, when they do, quite a few turn out to be malignant. Accordingly, radiologists interpreting women’s abdominal MRIs should be on the lookout for breast abnormalities.

Two studies validate efficacy of bioabsorbable breast cancer marker

A new implant to treat women with breast cancer has been deemed effective by two independent studies, an encouraging development for the bioabsorbable marker branded as BioZorb.

A game-changer is long overdue in breast-cancer research—and one may be just ahead

As far as we’ve come in the fight against breast cancer over the past 20 years, the state of actionable information is, circa 2016, fairly accurately encapsulated by an old bromide that’s often dispatched to denigrate perceptions of progress: The more things change, the more they stay the same.

Ultrasound safely omitted in imaging workups of women with breast pain and normal density tissue

Clinicians evaluating women with nondense breasts who are experiencing focal breast pain will find little to no value adding directed ultrasound to digital mammography when the latter is indicated due to screening scheduling. 

Hard numbers put to screening mammography overdiagnosis

Over the years since the advent of widespread screening mammography, overdiagnosis and overtreatment have become accepted as unfortunate but tolerable collateral troubles. There’s no shortage of literature using mathematical modeling to suggest as much. Now comes a new analysis of hard data, published Oct. 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine, to quantify the problem. 

5 pointers for breast rads willing to learn from common mistakes

It’s not unusual for radiologists reviewing prior breast imaging exams to discover cancers that went missed the first time around. Such circumstances can and should provide a valuable learning opportunity, according to the authors of an article running in the November-December edition of Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology.

PET-guided breast cancer therapy targets specific hormones in individual patients

A new PET-guided method to monitoring tumor growth could help doctors identify the ways cancer avoids certain kinds of treatment. Researchers published the results of a trial studying this method in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

 
More women getting screened for breast cancer as CMS’s shared-savings program matures

Crunching the data on screening mammography utilization in the wake of the establishment of Medicare’s Shared Savings Program, researchers at Johns Hopkins have found what they’re calling “small but significant” improvements: From 2012 to 2014, participating ACOs grew their screening volumes by a mean of 2.6 percent.

Breast density website reminds patients to dig deeper on internet searches

A website offering information about dense breasts, Dense Breast Info, wants women to be aware of their services, even though they aren’t always the first result in an internet search about breast density.

 

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