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Women's Imaging

 

Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) may soon command broader consideration than it’s been getting as a supplemental breast-screening tool. The modality not only finds many breast cancers that don’t show up on mammograms but also outperformed supplemental breast ultrasound in a study published online Oct. 28 in Clinical Imaging.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an Oct. 27 reminder that thermography is not an acceptable substitute for mammography.

Screening mammography providers “on wheels” planning to serve medically underserved Latino communities would do well to first communicate with each community on perceptions of such services and, where needed, to offer education prior to rolling in.

Following screening mammography that turns up nothing, women with dense breast tissue are much more likely to pursue additional imaging with automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) when two things happen: their radiologists inform them of their tissue density and encourage them to consider the secondary exam because of it.

Image quality in mammography, thanks to concerns about radiation dose, faces a Goldilocks problem—where radiologists want to get the best image possible, while also minimizing risk to the patient. 

 

Recent Headlines

MRI technique beats breast ultrasound at supplemental screening

Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) may soon command broader consideration than it’s been getting as a supplemental breast-screening tool. The modality not only finds many breast cancers that don’t show up on mammograms but also outperformed supplemental breast ultrasound in a study published online Oct. 28 in Clinical Imaging.

FDA: Thermography is not an alternative to mammography

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an Oct. 27 reminder that thermography is not an acceptable substitute for mammography.

Latinas tend to prefer fixed-site over mobile mammography—but many come around with education, experience

Screening mammography providers “on wheels” planning to serve medically underserved Latino communities would do well to first communicate with each community on perceptions of such services and, where needed, to offer education prior to rolling in.

Dense-breast patients nearly 10 times more likely to pursue ABUS after 2-part notification

Following screening mammography that turns up nothing, women with dense breast tissue are much more likely to pursue additional imaging with automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) when two things happen: their radiologists inform them of their tissue density and encourage them to consider the secondary exam because of it.

Research aims to improve mammography quality, control dosing

Image quality in mammography, thanks to concerns about radiation dose, faces a Goldilocks problem—where radiologists want to get the best image possible, while also minimizing risk to the patient. 

A promising trend: Women carving out larger share of radiology workforce

Radiology remains a field primarily populated by men, but new research hints that the gender gap in diversity may be closing.

Is a lack of personalization keeping women from mammograms?

Recent Swedish-based research examined the reasoning behind women refraining from mammography screenings.

Breast cancer incidentally found in 17% of chest CT patients

Thirteen of 75 patients who had abnormal incidental findings in the breast after undergoing chest CT, or 17.3 percent, ended up indeed having breast cancer in a recent study, prompting the authors to recommend follow-up breast-specific imaging in all such cases.

New study to pit mammography vs. DNA blood test

Can a genomics blood test catch signature bits of DNA that break off of breast-cancer cells and float through the bloodstream? If so, can the test reliably confirm mammography findings—or possibly alert clinicians to the presence of a tumor even more quickly than imaging can?

Patients less likely to use DBT screening mammography due to financial responsibility

Patients are less likely to choose digital breast tomosynthesis screening mammography (DBTSM), despite more accurate results than traditional 2D mammography screening (2DSM), because of potential financial considerations, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

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