Conferences

While AI wasn’t the only topic discussed during the SIIM 2019 annual meeting, every issue seemed to be tied to the emerging technology in one way or another.

Data security has become a serious issue in the U.S., not only for big tech companies like Facebook, but for vendors and institutions looking to use patient imaging information to develop AI platforms.

In the first five months of the EHR, radiology information system (RIS) and PACS deployment project, Robert Paul, a radiology informatics manager at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, lost 60% of his team. He described his efforts to reduce burnout among his staff during a presentation at the SIIM annual conference.

A deep neural network platform can help radiologists detect abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) on CT images, and is especially helpful in clinically challenging cases, according to research presented at the SIIM annual conference.

Blockchain could be used to streamline preauthorization, share images between institutions and empower patients. But if healthcare as a whole isn't interested in sharing data, no technology can solve the industry's imaging informatics problems.

 

A convolutional neural network (CNN) approach can accurately identify and sub-classify suspected tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs, according to research presented at the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.

In order to properly train and validate algorithms, developers need high volumes of quality-labeled data. But such datasets are not easy to obtain.

Intravenous (IV) administration of technetium-99m (99mTc) was shown to be a safe, noninvasive way to observe rheumatoid arthritis disease activity, according to a study presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) in Anaheim, Calif.

“The results of this research are extremely exciting, as it will significantly impact clinical care,” reported study author Mishal Mendiratta-Lala, MD, with the division of abdominal radiology at Michigan Medicine in Ann Arbor.

The ARRS also presented Jonathan S. Lewin, MD, with the Gold Medal for 2019 during its annual meeting in Honolulu.

Artificial intelligence (AI) and big data can help radiologists provide better care while reducing costs, but a majority of institutions lack the infrastructure to optimally consume and utilize these technologies, said Paul Chang, MD, of the University of Chicago, during RSNA's 2018 Annual Meeting.

Cryoablation—commonly called cryotherapy—demonstrated early effectiveness in treating women with low-risk breast cancer, reported researchers during a Nov. 29 session at RSNA’s 2018 Annual Meeting.