Residents benefit from time in contrast reaction management simulations

Participation in contrast reaction management simulations can help radiology residents provide better patient care, according to a new study published in Academic Radiology.

“Until recently, radiology resident education in contrast reaction management at our institution had been limited to didactic lectures,” wrote author Kaley Pippin, MD, with the department of radiology at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City, and colleagues. “Furthermore, infrequent patient contrast reactions had created wide variability in residents’ individual experiences managing them.”

To remedy that situation, the authors implemented a contrast reaction management simulation curriculum at their institution to help residents gain experience with handling such situations. Residents took part in these “high-fidelity, hands-on” simulations in 2016 and 2017. Participants were surveyed both before and after taking part in the simulation.

In 2016, participants were asked 12 specific questions to test their understanding of managing contrast reactions both before and after the simulations. After the simulations, the percentage of correct answers increased for 10 of those 12 questions. Participants also said their “comfort level in managing contrast reactions” had improved after the simulations.

In 2017, participants were asked 14 specific questions to test their understanding of managing contrast reactions both before and after the simulations. After the simulations, the percentage of correct answers increase for 12 of those 14 questions. Again, participants said their comfort level had improved after the simulations.

“The results of our survey suggest that incorporating hands-on contrast reaction management simulation into resident education improves both residents’ knowledge and comfort in managing reactions,” the authors wrote. “Residents also subjectively reported the simulation experience was beneficial to their education.”

Back in May, a study in the American Journal of Roentgenology found that using contrast reaction management checklists can reduce the number of mistakes made by radiologists.