Women's Imaging

Researchers from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill found the health risks of newborns born to women with breast cancer varied depending on the mother’s type of cancer.

Secondary lesions in breast cancer patients occur at varying rates—some individuals remain in a latent asymptomatic state without metastases longer than others.

Imaging centers across the country are adding three-dimensional (3D) mammography to the traditional 2D offering for its proven ability to better detect cancers. But, what’s less understood is its accuracy in detecting more advanced forms of cancer.

A new study published in the January issue of the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine has shown that a 3D Doppler ultrasound can more accurately determine altered fetal growth restriction (FGR) in fetuses vulnerable to developing abnormal cerebral vascular flow patterns than a standard 2D Doppler ultrasound.  

A Children’s National Health System team has found velocity-selective arterial spin labeling (VSASL), an advanced MRI technology, can detect early signs of global placental perfusion in pregnancies complicated by fetal congenital heart disease (CHD).

The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) developed a task force to develop a standardized consensus-based curriculum and competency assessment tools for OB-GYN ultrasounds, with the aim they would be used in residency programs.

Researchers, investigating how community practices are following breast cancer screening guidelines, found that high-risk individuals, especially those with a family history of the disease, were not receiving additional MRI scans to help in early detection.

Perhaps rules are meant to be broken. But guidelines, according to recent research, are not always followed when physicians recommend breast cancer screening to patients.

Researchers at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have developed a new method of using MRI technology to scan the placenta during a women's pregnancy. 

Being overweight is associated with a host of deleterious effects for an individual’s health, including increased risk for hypertension, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Now, research presented Nov. 27 at RSNA 2017 connected difficulties in detecting breast cancer in women with higher body mass indexes (BMI).  

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an Oct. 27 reminder that thermography is not an acceptable substitute for mammography.

Radiology remains a field primarily populated by men, but new research hints that the gender gap in diversity may be closing.