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New neuroimaging-based research at the University of Southern California has shown how, over time, the developing pubescent brain changes in distinct ways between boys and girls. 

Blu-Ray, 3D TVs and now virtual reality—three technologies that were each hailed at one point as the next big thing in consumer entertainment. One became ubiquitous, one all but disappeared and the jury’s still out on whether or not virtual reality (VR) is here to stay. 

Facial images extracted from publicly available radiology scans—think of head CT scans stored in open-access medical image repositories for research and education—are fairly easy to match with patients’ photos, raising concerns over privacy.

European researchers have demonstrated a dedicated setup for fast-acquisition, ultrahigh-resolution in vivo MRI of the finger, according to a study posted online in Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 

Two scientists used brain-imaging techniques to visualize the brain’s activity and view the reorganization of brain circuits while people start to lose their hearing. This allowed them to predict the success or failure of a cochlear implant amongst people who have become profoundly deaf in their adult life.

 

Recent Headlines

Puberty changes the brain in sex-specific ways

New neuroimaging-based research at the University of Southern California has shown how, over time, the developing pubescent brain changes in distinct ways between boys and girls. 

Virtual reality: Coming to an imaging provider near you?

Blu-Ray, 3D TVs and now virtual reality—three technologies that were each hailed at one point as the next big thing in consumer entertainment. One became ubiquitous, one all but disappeared and the jury’s still out on whether or not virtual reality (VR) is here to stay. 

Matching CT image data with patient photos, FBI researchers caution on privacy

Facial images extracted from publicly available radiology scans—think of head CT scans stored in open-access medical image repositories for research and education—are fairly easy to match with patients’ photos, raising concerns over privacy.

High-rez finger MRI may point way to burgeoning extremity uses for 7T

European researchers have demonstrated a dedicated setup for fast-acquisition, ultrahigh-resolution in vivo MRI of the finger, according to a study posted online in Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 

fMRI shows reorganization of neural circuits to improve cochlear implantation

Two scientists used brain-imaging techniques to visualize the brain’s activity and view the reorganization of brain circuits while people start to lose their hearing. This allowed them to predict the success or failure of a cochlear implant amongst people who have become profoundly deaf in their adult life.

Lack of physical activity could weaken bones in teens

University of British Columbia researchers and the Centre for Hip Health and Mobility researchers used high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) and found that teens who are inactive tend to have weaker bones than those who are physically active.

Every little thing fMRI does is magic: The unexpected intersection of Sting, neural imaging

When functional MRI (fMRI) was developed in the early 1990s, it was the latest in a long line of imaging modalities that allowed scientists and researchers to use changes in blood oxygenation and flow to infer neural activity. Since the seminal research paper was published by Seiji Ogawa, PhD—then working at AT&T Bell Laboratories—fMRI has provided insight in how the brain forms memories and processes pain, emotion, or language.

3D laser scanning proves MRI’s equal at assessing breast volume

Aussie researchers have found protocoled 3D laser scanning to be as good as noncontrast MRI for assessing breast volume, according to a small study running in the April edition of Annals of Plastic Surgery. 

CARS microscopy presents new method to detect skin cancer

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital’s Wellman Center for Photomedicine have used coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scatterings (CARS) microscopy to improve detection of melanoma, the most common skin cancer.

Paralyzed ALS patients use imaging to communicate

Drawing from previous neuroimaging research grounded in functional MRI, researchers have used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to help patients who have intact cognitive and emotional function but are “locked in” by total motor paralysis—as by Lou Gehrig’s disease—to communicate just by thinking. 

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