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When you close your eyes and visualize an important moment from the past, your brain may use the same eye movement patterns to reconstruct images long after you’ve originally seen them. It may seem like science fiction, but a study published in Cerebral Cortex found evidence of the phenomena.

Why does it seem like when alcohol gets involved, people often exhibit more aggressive behavior thanks to “liquid courage”? According to a group of international researchers, it’s because changes occur in the prefrontal cortex—the area of the brain charged with tempering a person’s aggression—after two drinks.

 

According to a recent study published in JAMA Neurology, memory decline and the potential to develop Alzheimer's disease may increasingly accelerate with age in certain individuals. 

A group of international researchers has discovered two large proteins in the brain that work together in producing its ‘stop’ and ‘go’ functions, much like a children’s game of “Red Light, Green Light.”

We put on our headphones every day, but who considers what allows singers to reach the high notes? Swiss researchers, that’s who.

 

Recent Headlines

Eyes help remember images, long after first seen

When you close your eyes and visualize an important moment from the past, your brain may use the same eye movement patterns to reconstruct images long after you’ve originally seen them. It may seem like science fiction, but a study published in Cerebral Cortex found evidence of the phenomena.

Has imaging spied a connection between alcohol, anger?

Why does it seem like when alcohol gets involved, people often exhibit more aggressive behavior thanks to “liquid courage”? According to a group of international researchers, it’s because changes occur in the prefrontal cortex—the area of the brain charged with tempering a person’s aggression—after two drinks.

 

PET links accelerating memory decline to APOE ε4 allele

According to a recent study published in JAMA Neurology, memory decline and the potential to develop Alzheimer's disease may increasingly accelerate with age in certain individuals. 

Researchers pinpoint how the brain regulates itself

A group of international researchers has discovered two large proteins in the brain that work together in producing its ‘stop’ and ‘go’ functions, much like a children’s game of “Red Light, Green Light.”

What allows singers to hit high notes? CT scans provide insight

We put on our headphones every day, but who considers what allows singers to reach the high notes? Swiss researchers, that’s who.

New MRI brain mapping method links between connectivity, IQ

Researchers, led by scientists at the University of Cambridge, have found a correlation between interconnectivity of brain regions and individual intelligence using brain MRI, according to a study published online in Neuron.

Stem cells unharmed by low-dose x-rays

A team of researchers found stem cells remained healthy after exposure to low-dose x-ray radiation, according to a study published in Aging.

MRI capable of predicting age-related changes in thigh muscles

Researchers explored using MRI to distinguish age-related changes and as a tool to evaluated aging thigh muscles. The study used four quantitative MRI techniques: intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI), multiecho Dixon water-fat imaging and dynamic contrast material–enhanced (DCE) MR imaging.

Injectable MRI technique could help detect heart disease

New technology developed at New York’s Binghamton University could change the way clinicians detect heart disease with MRI scans, research published in the journal Colloid and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces suggests.

fMRI illuminates brain changes in those who show more gratitude

Around this time of year, people are reminded it’s better to give than receive. According to recent research using functional MRI (fMRI) to examine brain function, this is true when it comes to giving thanks. Gratitude may be good for mental health and increase overall feelings of altruism.

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