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CT colonography aided by computer detection has proven sharp at finding colorectal polyps 6 mm or larger—and at earning reimbursement—in routine clinical practice, where it also had an acceptable false-positive rate, according to a study running in the June edition of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

“WannaCry,” the most recent ransomware attack in the United Kingdom, was yet another reminder of how dependent modern healthcare is on networked technology. The National Health Service experienced ambulances piling up outside hospitals, appointments were canceled, surgeries were delayed and there was the frightening possibility that patient records could be deleted unless a ransom was paid.

Teenagers who came into the world as “preemies” have altered brain connectivity on MRI, as well as differences in cognitive function, compared with their peers who spent the full nine months in utero.

Harvard and MIT researchers have found that the more reading schoolkids do over the summer, the more their brains develop—and those who struggle with reading and come from low-income households stand to make the most impressive gains.

Artificial intelligence is driving change into pathology as well as radiology. In Canada, for example, researchers have developed a lens-less microscope that uses algorithms based on mathematical models of light to produce large-scale slide images in 3D.

 

Recent Headlines

Computer-assisted CT colonography performs well, gets reimbursed

CT colonography aided by computer detection has proven sharp at finding colorectal polyps 6 mm or larger—and at earning reimbursement—in routine clinical practice, where it also had an acceptable false-positive rate, according to a study running in the June edition of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

When it comes to cybersecurity, imaging departments must prepare for the worst

“WannaCry,” the most recent ransomware attack in the United Kingdom, was yet another reminder of how dependent modern healthcare is on networked technology. The National Health Service experienced ambulances piling up outside hospitals, appointments were canceled, surgeries were delayed and there was the frightening possibility that patient records could be deleted unless a ransom was paid.

More evidence of preterm birth affecting brain development in adolescents

Teenagers who came into the world as “preemies” have altered brain connectivity on MRI, as well as differences in cognitive function, compared with their peers who spent the full nine months in utero.

MRI shows summer reading physically increases children’s brain power

Harvard and MIT researchers have found that the more reading schoolkids do over the summer, the more their brains develop—and those who struggle with reading and come from low-income households stand to make the most impressive gains.

AI-powered microscope has no lens yet ‘sees’ nanoparticles for pathologists

Artificial intelligence is driving change into pathology as well as radiology. In Canada, for example, researchers have developed a lens-less microscope that uses algorithms based on mathematical models of light to produce large-scale slide images in 3D.

SNMMI partnering with NDSC to disseminate appropriate-use criteria

Clinicians referring patients for imaging with nuclear and molecular modalities will soon be able to do so with ready access to utilization assistance that’s based on appropriate-use criteria developed by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).

MRI as accurate as CT for Crohn’s disease detection, management

Both MRI and CT are highly accurate when it comes to detecting Crohn’s disease in the small intestine, and MRI can be the go-to modality when radiation exposure is an issue—as can be the case due to the repetitive imaging that’s often indicated for managing this chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

Misidentified sniffs may point to early-stage Alzheimer’s

Mayo Clinic researchers have found a correlation between neuroimaging biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease and results from a literal smell test: If at-risk older folks are losing their sense of smell, they’re more likely to be developing the disease than their well-smelling peers. 

Smokers’ brains show cognitive avoidance toward visual quitting aids

A small but fascinating functional MRI study has shown how smokers may stubbornly harden their minds against the psychological quitting-assistance technique known as aversive conditioning. 

3D printed 'bionic skin' could aid in health monitoring

A revolutionary process for 3D printing stretchable electronic sensory devices that could be used to produce real human skin has recently been developed by researchers at the University of Minnesota.

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