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Diagnostic Imaging

 

Researchers from the Boston University School of Medicine have found evidence of CTE in young athletes’ brains without signs of concussion, indicating the condition is directly tied to head impacts—but not necessarily concussive hits.

By 2030, an estimated 65.7 million people are predicted to be affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a 30 million person jump from today’s total. But, there’s increasing evidence that biomarkers coupled with the correct imaging technique may provide crucial insights into the disease.

Postoperative CT, most notably 3D CT scans, are the preferred imaging technique in evaluating intra-articular screw penetration of proximal humerus fractures, according to a study published in Academic Radiology.

Headaches are common in children, and many tools, often related to neuroimaging, exist to diagnose the situation, but there remains little standardized procedure in approaching individual cases and little clarity around the benefits and risks of pursuing imaging.

A recent retrospective study of brain and spinal MRI of patients suspected or known to have multiple sclerosis showed that the introduction of a structured reporting template produced reports with more adequate information for clinical decision making. The results were published in the American Journal of Roentgenology

 

Recent Headlines

Boston U: Repeated impacts, not concussion, cause CTE

Researchers from the Boston University School of Medicine have found evidence of CTE in young athletes’ brains without signs of concussion, indicating the condition is directly tied to head impacts—but not necessarily concussive hits.

5 things to know about imaging’s fight against Alzheimer’s

By 2030, an estimated 65.7 million people are predicted to be affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a 30 million person jump from today’s total. But, there’s increasing evidence that biomarkers coupled with the correct imaging technique may provide crucial insights into the disease.

TEE simulator uses patient images to improve cardiology training

Training using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) simulators typically relies on grainy drawings of patients in black and white. But a new version, developed by a team from the University of Washington led by Florence Sheehan, MD, can display 3D images of a hypothetical patient, allowing users to look for blood clots and other abnormalities.

Post-op CT more accurately detects screw penetration in arm fractures

Postoperative CT, most notably 3D CT scans, are the preferred imaging technique in evaluating intra-articular screw penetration of proximal humerus fractures, according to a study published in Academic Radiology.

2 steps to stop stroke: CT, blood test can predict recurrence

Stroke recurrence is a threat combatted with drug therapy and predictive testing. Researchers have combined CT imaging and genetic blood testing to identify individuals at risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).

4 things to know about imaging pediatric headaches

Headaches are common in children, and many tools, often related to neuroimaging, exist to diagnose the situation, but there remains little standardized procedure in approaching individual cases and little clarity around the benefits and risks of pursuing imaging.

Structured reports for brain, spinal MRI improve care for MS patients

A recent retrospective study of brain and spinal MRI of patients suspected or known to have multiple sclerosis showed that the introduction of a structured reporting template produced reports with more adequate information for clinical decision making. The results were published in the American Journal of Roentgenology

Evidence lacking in using radiography to diagnose constipation in children

Abdominal radiographs have been used to diagnose functional constipation in children and adolescents, despite a lack of evidence showing reliability. Researchers from the Boston Children’s Hospital examined how gastroenterologists use the images in diagnosing young patients.

CEUS works well for central-line check, less so for ruling out misplacement

Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging is safe, efficient and highly specific for confirming location and placement of central venous catheter tips in adult patients, according to a medical literature meta-analysis running in the December edition of the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine.

POCUS excels in management of intra-abdominal hypertension

Point-of-care ultrasound has shown notable prowess as an adjuvant tool for aiding both diagnosis and treatment of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), a common complication in critically ill patients, according to a study published online Nov. 28 in Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy.

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