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Diagnostic Imaging

 

Athletes suffering suspected tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are often adequately assessed with clinical diagnostic tests performed in the clinician’s office. When these are inconclusive, diagnostic arthroscopy is the gold standard—and MRI is a generally low-value option due to its time and cost burdens.

Parents may start to reconsider treatment options when it comes to the effects of anesthesia on their children thanks to new findings from Boston Children's Hospital. 

Radiology researchers at Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C., have shown that infrared thermal testing is better than the human touch at finding wear spots and other defects in protective lead aprons.

After getting imaged, outpatients expect to hear back on the results within one to three days. If the wait goes longer than that, they’re likely to feel worried—or perhaps perturbed—and call in for themselves within five days, according to researchers at the University of Michigan.

Routine follow up CT imaging in elderly patients who have experienced head trauma may need to be implemented into standardized treatment plans at a more cost-effective rate, according to a recent article by JACR.  

 

Recent Headlines

MRI may be more trouble than it’s worth for diagnosing ACL tears

Athletes suffering suspected tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are often adequately assessed with clinical diagnostic tests performed in the clinician’s office. When these are inconclusive, diagnostic arthroscopy is the gold standard—and MRI is a generally low-value option due to its time and cost burdens.

Baby MRIs show prolonged anesthesia may cause brain atrophy

Parents may start to reconsider treatment options when it comes to the effects of anesthesia on their children thanks to new findings from Boston Children's Hospital. 

Defective lead aprons give themselves up to infrared light

Radiology researchers at Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C., have shown that infrared thermal testing is better than the human touch at finding wear spots and other defects in protective lead aprons.

Awaiting imaging results, patients remain patient for up to 3 days

After getting imaged, outpatients expect to hear back on the results within one to three days. If the wait goes longer than that, they’re likely to feel worried—or perhaps perturbed—and call in for themselves within five days, according to researchers at the University of Michigan.

Follow-up head CT in elderly trauma patients can detect new hemorrhages

Routine follow up CT imaging in elderly patients who have experienced head trauma may need to be implemented into standardized treatment plans at a more cost-effective rate, according to a recent article by JACR.  

New emergency rad-report system passes test

Radiologists and ED physicians at Brown University have developed a simple, five-category system for triaging imaged emergency patients based on their radiology reports, and the team’s test of the system has shown very good interobserver agreement.

Healthy runners, along with arthritic patients, show inflammation in sacroiliac MRI

Axial spondyloarthropathy (axSpA), a chronic form of arthritis in the lower back, often causes inflammation in one’s sacroiliac joints, which connects the sacrum to the pelvis. But a retroactive study of MRI showed inflammation also can be seen in healthy individuals and not only those affected by axSpA, demonstrating the importance of other diagnostic measures.

Structured prostate MRI reports boost clinical impact

BI-RADS, developed by the American College of Radiology, changed how radiologists and specialists communicate with its implementation in the 1980s. A group of researchers aimed to develop a structured prostate MRI report to improve communication between radiologists and referring urologists.

In radiology research, collaboration is key to clout

Radiology research is maximally influential when it’s conducted collaboratively and the contributors hail from multiple disciplines, institutions and geographic locations.

Docs in the dark on radiation risks in imaging, but a quick briefing lights the way

Hospital-based clinicians are not well-versed in the specifics of radiation exposure and risk to patients sent for imaging, but a brief education session may be all it takes to bring them up to speed.

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