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Healthcare Economics & Policy

 

The NIH has announced the formation of a five-year, $70 million effort to organize, coordinate and otherwise accelerate new research into Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

The opioid epidemic continues to make headlines as it takes lives across the country. One radiologists sees how the industry can do more to engage patients in this vulnerable population.

More than half of U.S. radiologists practice mainly as generalists, yet those who fit this description dedicate, on average, one-third of their work time to a single subspecialty, according to a study conducted by Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute researchers and published online Nov. 27 in Radiology.

Should a radiologist be a direct communicator to patients? Should they help physicians diagnose and manage patients? Or can they do both?

HealthImaging sat down with RSNA President Richard Ehman, MD, to talk about RSNA 2017 and reinventing radiology. 

 

Recent Headlines

RSNA 2017: Is it time to reinvent radiology?

HealthImaging sat down with RSNA President Richard Ehman, MD, to talk about RSNA 2017 and reinventing radiology. 

$70M lined up for new Alzheimer’s research consortium

The NIH has announced the formation of a five-year, $70 million effort to organize, coordinate and otherwise accelerate new research into Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

RSNA 2017: Emergency rads on the front lines of opioid crisis

The opioid epidemic continues to make headlines as it takes lives across the country. One radiologists sees how the industry can do more to engage patients in this vulnerable population.

Most subspecialist radiologists are generalists most of the time

More than half of U.S. radiologists practice mainly as generalists, yet those who fit this description dedicate, on average, one-third of their work time to a single subspecialty, according to a study conducted by Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute researchers and published online Nov. 27 in Radiology.

RSNA 2017: Is a radiologist the doctor's doctor, the patient's physician—or both?

Should a radiologist be a direct communicator to patients? Should they help physicians diagnose and manage patients? Or can they do both?

4 imaging exams called out as examples of unnecessary care

In its fourth annual update on medical overuse, JAMA Internal Medicine names 10 procedures and practices that are ripe for the curtailing. In the category of “overtesting,” the klieg lights fall on four exams—and all are based in imaging.

ACR’s Kassing: What imaging business could get by on $15 for CT and $35 for MRI?

Anthem’s recent decision to no longer pay for outpatient CT and MR exams performed in hospitals didn’t come from nowhere—and, going forward, the move is not likely to be an outlier among private payers’ business stratagems.

Family-med practices take a bite out of inappropriate low-back MRI

In Harris County, Texas, three outpatient family-medicine affiliates of Baylor College of Medicine have slashed their unnecessary orders of lumbar-spine MRIs—and improved the appropriateness ratings of those they did order—by attending educational sessions and using the American College of Radiology’s R-SCAN program.

MEDNAX acquires Jefferson Radiology, its third practice in 2017

MEDNAX has acquired Hartford–based Jefferson Radiology and Jefferson Imaging Associates as part of MEDNAX’s vRad—a global teleradiology company with over 500 U.S. board-certified radiologists.

1st-year med students edified by intro to interventional radiology

Offering first-year medical students an elective introduction to interventional radiology (IR), researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and its Perelman School of Medicine have found considerable receptivity to the learning opportunity and heightened interest in the specialty.

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