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Molecular Imaging

 

According to a recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) press release, new research suggests that genetic variations in the lungs can differentiate between individuals who have stably low lung function early in life (that steadily declines with age) versus those who are at risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to smoking.  

Researchers from the Chinese University of Hong Kong and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago have combined international expertise and two types of technology to predict how well a deaf child can learn language after receiving cochlear implant surgery. 

A team of researchers has proven a new radiotracer, 2-18F-fluorodeoxysorbitol (18F-FDS), more adept at tracking bacterial infection in lungs than current imaging methods, while also distinguishing bacterial infection from inflammation.

Head trauma and sports—most notably football but also hockey, soccer and boxing—have been the focus of plenty of media coverage. Recent studies have shown an overwhelming majority of deceased football player’s brains contained evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE.

PET is already considered the most sensitive non-surgical techniques for studying physiology, metabolism and molecular pathways, but experts believe recent developments may drastically increase its capabilities.

 

Recent Headlines

New COPD genetic breakthrough could identify at risk patients earlier on

According to a recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) press release, new research suggests that genetic variations in the lungs can differentiate between individuals who have stably low lung function early in life (that steadily declines with age) versus those who are at risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to smoking.  

Brain MRI, artificial intelligence predicts deaf children's capacity to learn language

Researchers from the Chinese University of Hong Kong and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago have combined international expertise and two types of technology to predict how well a deaf child can learn language after receiving cochlear implant surgery. 

Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology names Kathy Thomas as new editor

Kathy Thomas has been named the new editor of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology (JNMT).

Innovative PET tracer identifies, tracks bacterial lung infection

A team of researchers has proven a new radiotracer, 2-18F-fluorodeoxysorbitol (18F-FDS), more adept at tracking bacterial infection in lungs than current imaging methods, while also distinguishing bacterial infection from inflammation.

60 Minutes: CTE, TBI prove 'invisible injuries' for returning soldiers

Head trauma and sports—most notably football but also hockey, soccer and boxing—have been the focus of plenty of media coverage. Recent studies have shown an overwhelming majority of deceased football player’s brains contained evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE.

Total-body PET maximizes imaging sensitivity

PET is already considered the most sensitive non-surgical techniques for studying physiology, metabolism and molecular pathways, but experts believe recent developments may drastically increase its capabilities.

Functional connectivity tied to balance in MS patients

A team of Italian researchers used resting-state fMRI to examine functional connectivity abnormalities in the brain in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). They wanted to see how abnormalities in cerebellar dentate nuclei (DNs) affect an individual’s balance, posture and muscle tone.

Brain structure tied to obsessive-compulsive symptoms in children

New research from a Spanish team of researchers used MRI to explore whether subclinical obsessive-compulsive symptoms in children could be related to the brain’s structure.

Imaging links brain lesions, criminal behavior with decision-making networks

In rare cases, brain lesions can lead previously law-abiding individuals to criminal behavior. Researchers, led by Ryan Darby, MD, an assistant professor of neurology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, examined MRI and CT scans to see if such injuries can lead to deteriorated decision-making and a disregard for morality.

Female collegiate athletes more likely to experience concussions

A recent study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) found that females are more likely to experience sports-related concussions (SRCs) than males, narrowing the research gap of sex specific predictors of occurrence and recovery from SRCs.

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