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Oncology Imaging

 

Five years ago the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) advised clinicians not to order advanced imaging or tumor marker tests for survivors of early-stage breast cancer. Yet the exam orders keep coming.

Reviewing brain MRI of close to 4,000 children as part of an ongoing population-based study, European neuroradiologists and neuroscientists discovered at least one incidental finding in more than one-quarter of the cohort.

The National Academy of Medicine announced Monday, Oct. 17, that it elected 80 new members, including Deborah Watkins Bruner, RN, PhD, a professor of radiation oncology at Emory University in Atlanta. 

A single 90-minute examination designed to assess chemotherapy-induced injuries of the brain, heart and joints among childhood cancer survivors has been proven feasible by a new study.

Starting annual screening mammography for breast cancer at age 40 helps detect a significant number of cancers, according to a recent study published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

 

Recent Headlines

Generic version of Gleevec to hit U.S. market

A generic equivalent to Gleevec, imatinib mesylate tablets that treat chronic myeloid leukemia, will now be available in the U.S. for multiple purposes approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Research examines how liver cancer could be misclassified

Diagnosing strains of liver cancer can be difficult because they are usually simila, but physicians have various tools to help them. Now, new research at Washington University has found these approaches may not always be accurate.

Lung imaging method helps lower radiotherapy toxicity, study finds

Radiotherapy, a process designed to cure cancer by destroying cancerous tumors, can be harmful to patients if it targets the wrong areas. It is also can be difficult to manage. But new research found a method to perform selective radiotherapy, which can reduce toxicity in the body.

Study: E-cig vapors contain cancer-causing chemicals

Electronic cigarettes contain two previously undiscovered probable carcinogens in their vapor, according to a study in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

MRI proves a viable contender for prostate screening, but hurdles loom

A pilot study using MRI as the primary screening test for prostate cancer has shown the imaging modality better at predicting the disease than popular—yet controversial—prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood testing. 

Precision oncology demands fluency in drug toxicity by radiologists

A team of Harvard radiologists is advising fellow rads to bone up on imaging-evident drug toxicity so as to shed their reputation as providers of a standalone service and, more to the point, cement their role as central members of the cancer team in this era of precision oncology. 

Nonsolid lung nodules safely controlled by once-a-year CT scans

Potential lung cancers that show up as nonsolid nodules (NSNs) are innocuous enough that they can be appropriately managed by annual low-dose CT scans in lieu of immediate biopsy or treatment, according to a study published July 5 in Radiology. 

High PSA levels in middle-age men could indicate higher risk for prostate cancer

A new study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology has found that men who have higher-than-normal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in middle age are more likely to have fatal prostate cancer later in life.

 
USPSTF update: ‘Not enough’ people getting screened for colorectal cancer

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has done some fresh thinking on the pros and cons of screening for colorectal cancer, posting updated recommendations June 15 in JAMA.

Miniature multimodality scanner said to be in development for endoscopic imaging

From Portugal comes word of an endoscopic scanner in the works that will provide advanced imaging scans acquired within the body and, in the process, aid early detection of pancreatic and other cancers that are often found too late. 

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