Women's Imaging

Compared to using standard or full-field digital mammography (FFDM), administering mammograms with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reduces the risk of benign biopsies while maintaining a favorable cancer detection rate, according to research out of the U.K.

An AI approach developed by Dutch researchers performed similarly to radiologists at detecting breast cancer, according to a multi-center, multi-dataset study published March 5 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

DBT also identified more cancers and lowered recall rates in patients of all ages and breast density types.

“This legislation is an important step in ensuring patients are appropriately notified about their risk of breast cancer so they can make informed decisions about their care,” Dennis Durmis, chair of MITA’s Board of Directors, said in a prepared statement. 

Radiologists who interpret traditional two-dimensional (2D) mammograms required little time in transitioning to reading digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) exams or three-dimensional (3D) mammograms, and improved their accuracy in cancer detection, according to research published online Feb. 26 in Radiology.  

“There is no valid scientific data to show that thermographic devices, when used on their own or with another diagnostic test, are an effective screening tool for any medical condition, including the early detection of breast cancer or other diseases and conditions,” the FDA wrote. “The agency stresses that mammography is the only screening method proven to reduce deaths from breast cancer through early detection.”  

“These suggestions can help clinics and providers make changes to how they communicate screening mammogram results,” wrote Biren A. Shah, MD, of Virginia Commonwealth University Health System in Richmond, in a recent Journal of the American College of Radiology study.

For AI to become clinically feasible in women’s imaging, it must excel in the areas of performance, time, workflow and cost, according to an opinion piece published online in the American Journal of Roentgenology.  

Breast cancer screening centers may want to consider implementing digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital mammography (DM) into their practice, according to results of a recent Radiology study. Pairing both modalities significantly increased the sensitivity and specificity of detecting breast cancers.

The new American Society of Breast Surgeons' recommendations are based on a comprehensive review of the most impactful evidence in modern literature, data and national guidelines.

 

 

“Attempts to reduce this variation through clear guidelines and standardization may avoid confusion among referring physicians and patients, improve allocation of limited imaging resources, and reduce inconvenience to patients," wrote lead author Bhavika K. Patel, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, and colleagues in a recent study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. 

“Because breast parenchyma may reflect the biologic risk factors associated with breast cancer development, yielding the stromal parenchyma as an indicator of precancer, the combination of parenchyma and tumor characteristics may provide a stronger predictive model of malignancy,” lead author Hui Li, PhD, and colleagues wrote in a new study published in Radiology